Elder Care Information

Caregiving Across The Miles-Tips for Successful Long Distance Caregiving


Caring for a parent or a loved one is a difficult job. Your duties as a caregiver become increasingly difficult as the miles increase between you and your loved one. The following are a few helpful tips in order to plan ahead in the event your loved one needs your help, as well as ideas on how to become a successful caregiver once your caregiving duties begin.

1. Have a discussion with your loved one. Years before the need for caregiving arises, discuss ideas and thoughts with your loved one. Discuss with them their thoughts on possibilities of relocation, assisted living or nursing home care, and end of life arrangements. Make sure all of their legal and financial needs have been met. Talking with your loved one ahead of time will make them more comfortable with the idea of needing help down the road.

2. Design a "Family Plan of Action". Before the need arises, get the family together and discuss responsibilities and divide them up accordingly. Devise a plan to keep in contact with those members who may be out of state by frequent phone calls, emails or set up a private chat room on the internet for family discussions. Investigate costs for care and travel expenses. Design contingency plans in the event that funds run out, level of care increases, and availability of family is limited.

3. Gather emergency contact information. Make a list of important emergency numbers such as out of town family members, family friends, physicians, attorneys, clergy, etc. To help preserve this list in the event of an emergency, place this list in a zip lock bag and store it in your loved one's freezer where they keep their ice cubes. Place a magnet on their refrigerator with a note as to the location of this list.

4. Gather important documents. Locate important documents such as social security card, Medicare and/or health insurance cards, legal documents such as living trusts, wills, and powers of attorney, all financial statements including life insurance information and real estate deeds. Inform the family regarding the location of these documents. Keep copies of powers of attorney in the event you need to make health care or financial decisions from a distance.

5. Organize and set up a network. Contact relatives, friends and neighbors who live close by your loved one. Ask them to routinely stop by and visit your loved one, and ask them to contact you if they observe anything out of the ordinary. Find out about community programs that provide services such as meals or transportation, and get them involved. Consider hiring a geriatric care manager to help coordinate the care.

6. Make the most of your visits. Schedule and attend physician appointments with your loved one when you are in town, and keep yourself informed with your loved one's diagnosis. Meet with members of your network, and ask them detailed questions about their interaction with your loved one.

7. Keep a journal. Take detailed notes of your loved one's care such as their progress, medications, changes in level of care, recent injuries, personality changes, etc. A journal will help keep the family organized, as well as provide helpful information for the physician or other caregivers who might be involved in your loved one's care.

8. Be observant. Be aware of changes in your loved one's personality, their appearance such as lack of grooming or soiled clothing. Verify that the mail is being opened and the bills are being paid. Set up a consistent schedule for communicating with your loved one, and pay attention to what they're "not" saying. Remember, your loved one doesn't want to give up their independence, and they may not always tell you the truth.

9. Re-evaluate the situation. Assess your loved one's situation and don't be afraid to make adjustments as the circumstances change. Don't hesitate asking for help from other family members, and investigate the potential for placement in a care facility or hiring a full time live-in caregiver if the family and physician deems necessary.

10. Care for the caregiver. Don't allow yourself to get to the point that you experience burn-out. Get help from other family members, as well as take time for yourself. Maintain a healthy diet and exercise daily. When caregiving becomes too much for the family, and the level of care is beyond your immediate resources, seek out other options. Don't let your guilt get in the way of providing the best care for your loved one, even if a care facility or full time caregiver must provide that care instead of you.

Above all, remember to allow your loved one to remain involved in the decision making process for as long as their decisions do not negatively impact their health or safety. Remember to discuss your concerns with their care in a sensitive manner. Your loved one deserves to be treated with dignity and respect. Be realistic about the situation, and in addition to looking out for your loved one's care, remember to look out for your own as well.

---------------------------------------------------------------

You have permission to use this article as long as the author's full bio is present as well as any hyperlinks to author's website.

Torey L. Farnsworth, CSA has over 12 years of experience working with seniors. Ms. Farnsworth's vast expertise encompasses a wide variety of senior issues ranging from adult care to elder law. Most recently, Torey served as Elder Law Director and Paralegal for a Phoenix based law firm where she provided assistance in a variety of areas including long term care planning, estate planning, ALTCS eligibility and Medicaid planning. Ms. Farnsworth is also a certified caregiver with the State of Arizona as well as a Certified Senior Advisor. Ms. Farnsworth has spent her career in senior care as her family owns and operates assisted living homes.

Ms. Farnsworth currently owns her own senior care placement business called Horizon Senior Care Referral. Her placement services are free to seniors and their families in Arizona. For more information, visit http://www.adultcarecentral.com


MORE RESOURCES:
This RSS feed URL is deprecated, please update. New URLs can be found in the footers at https://news.google.com/news


Press-Enterprise

76-year-old man missing from Norco elder care center
Press-Enterprise
NORCO >> A 76-year-old man who went missing from his Norco elderly care facility has Riverside County Sheriff's officials concerned, they said Friday. John McCormack suffers from dementia and diabetes and The Norco Sheriff's Office is seeking the ...



TIME

Death and Dilemmas in America's Elder Health Care System | Time
TIME
By late 2014, Chabela Lawrence wasn't doing well. She had mostly stopped cooking and cleaning for herself and began, every so often, to get lost on her way ...

and more »


NBCNews.com

Can These Little Robots Ease the Big Eldercare Crunch?
NBCNews.com
Is the U.S. facing an eldercare crunch? By 2050, the number of Americans 65 or older will balloon to 88 million — almost double the current tally — and it seems there aren't enough younger people to look after them all, especially as Alzheimer's ...

and more »


No generators may cause fines for local elder care homes
The Ledger
LAKELAND – State officials have removed two local elder-care facilities from its list of nursing homes and assisted living facilities that have not complied with Gov. Rick Scott's emergency order to obtain emergency generators to provide electricity ...

and more »


Sun Sentinel

New nursing home legislation would strengthen elder care ombudsman
Sun Sentinel
The Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills where14 people died when it lost air conditioning during Hurricane Irma could have its license permanently revoked and fined of about $43,000.Florida's Agency for Health Care Administration made the move on ...

and more »


The Sentinel

Elder Care: Understanding palliative care vs. hospice
The Sentinel
The concept of hospice care began in England in the late 1940s, and was introduced in the United States in the 1960s. Hospice care focuses on providing comfort rather than curative treatment for individuals who are experiencing a terminal illness. This ...

and more »


Employee Benefit Adviser

Elder care support emerges as new legal service
Employee Benefit Adviser
With the average cost of an attorney ranging from $50 to $1,000 per hour, it is no surprise more employers are looking to offer legal services as a retaining benefit for employees. Dennis Healy, chief sales officer for international legal insurance ...



TODAYonline

TODAYonline | Finnish company brings concepts of choice ...
TODAYonline
The interior of Hovi Club, a new senior activity centre at Turf City where clients may opt to groom and feed horses, pet rabbits, or do aqua therapy in the ...

and more »


WLS-TV

How to avoid an elder care crisis
WLS-TV
Over 40 million people are caring for older relatives, many with Alzheimer's disease or one of the nearly 100 other forms of dementia. (WLS). WLS. Sunday, November 12, 2017 07:12AM. CHICAGO (WLS) --. Over 40 million people are caring for older ...



WFSU

Tallahassee Community Chorus Sings for Eldercare Services
WFSU
Tallahassee has one of the nation's best community singing groups. That Community Chorus will be presenting its Fall Concert program this coming Sunday, Nov. 19, at Florida State University's Ruby Diamond Concert Hall.


Google News

home | site map
© 2009 Asteroidsearch .om